Is American History Inverting Itself?

August 5, 2011

Barack Obama: The Democrats’ Richard Nixon? – Bruce Bartlett

While my family waits for our mailbox to be set up I act as a sort of go-between mailman, biking over to a USPS office a couple times a week to pick up our mail. In the parking lot, a couple of guys had set up a stand adorned by a poster of Barack Obama’s face with a Hitler-stache. I was able to ignore them for a couple of weeks because I knew these were the guys who thought Obama wasn’t “Kenyan Socialist” enough. And after the budget deal, I kind of had to agree with them. So I decided to suffer the fools and ask them whether they had considered what they were doing was counterproductive:

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National Hypocrisy Ceiling Surpassed; Moral Legitimacy of Country tanking

July 31, 2011

What would normally be a routine debt ceiling increase for President Obama has turned into the perfect Congressional storm, bringing the United States dangerously close to a default and raising questions as to whether our government can actually function anymore, considering the 112th US Congress has been among the least productive in history, thus far.

But amid heated debates lawmakers have failed to recognize that another, lesser-known, yet possibly far more important ceiling has been disregarded, hit, and tremendously surpassed: The national hypocrisy ceiling. In fact, the sanity deficits being run in Washington today are unparalleled in history, comparable perhaps only to the three-fifths-compromise following the Declaration of Independence, or perhaps the “Grandfather clause” in Reconstruction South polling practices, which enabled poor whites to circumvent a polling tax which essentially disenfranchised poor freedmen. The budget on this issue was last balanced about 55 years ago during the actually bipartisan Eisenhower era. The Congressional Budget Office has identified some major sources of hypocrisy which have played a role in escalating the crisis:

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